Damaged Hair: The Causes & The Treatment



damaged-hairSplit ends, breakage and a dull, lacklustre finish are all red flags that signal when your hair is less-than-amazing.

Here’s what science has to say about the factors that are causing damage to your hair.

There are in fact four ways that you can damage your hair.

1. Mechanical

This kind of damage occurs when you brush, comb and roughly towel-dry your hair.You’re more likely to cause damage when your hair is wet. Imagine your hair is like a spring. A spring will pull and snap back, but it will eventually get to a point where it doesn’t snap back because it starts to unravel inside. Then one day, you pull the spring and it snaps. When your hair is wet, it’s easier to stretch out that ‘spring’, which is why you shouldn’t try playing around with it too much.

To combat this, try squeezing (instead of rubbing) the moisture out of your hair with a towel and brush/comb it when it’s mostly dry.

2. Thermal

It should come as no surprise that the heat from your hair tools damages your mane. The sad truth is that if you want to style your hair, heat is important. So what’s a girl to do? Hair responds to temperatures differently, and the higher the temperature, the more you’re damaging the protein in your hair.

So, instead of cranking up your hair straightener to a high temperature and going over each section of hair once or twice, set the tool to a lower temperature and do a few more strokes. It may take you a few extra minutes, but isn’t it worth it to save your strands?

3. Chemical

Bleaching, colouring, perming, and relaxing your hair all take a hit at its health. But the degree of damage depends on how aggressive the treatment is. This means that relaxing or perming your hair (which involves quite a few chemicals) and lightening your hair from brown to platinum blonde is far more damaging than colouring your hair brown using a semi or permanent hair dye.

And if you want to get a bit more science-y, dyeing also strips the ‘F-layer’ of your hair. This layer of fatty acid is bound to your hair cuticle and is responsible for your hair’s natural shine, smoothness and softness. So when it’s stripped away, you’re left with hair that’s drier, rougher and yes, more susceptible to damage.

4. Environmental

UV radiation is a huge contributing factor to hair damage. It penetrates hair and breaks down its protein. And here’s another thing – blonde beauties are worse off than brunettes.  See, pigments (natural ones or those from hair dye) break down before protein, so if you have brown hair (i.e. more pigments), the pigments will absorb the UV rays first, whereas if you have blonde hair, your hair will become weaker quicker because it doesn’t have pigments.

While it’s all well and good to be more aware of what causes damaged hair, what do you do about repairing current damage?

You actually can’t repair the actual damage done (as hair is essentially dead and there’s no way to ‘glue back together’ a cuticle and repair a split end) but you can fix the effects of the damage and make your hair work as if the damage wasn’t there.

Damaged hair has a higher concentration of negative ions, meaning its proteins are more negatively charged (which is why your hair goes static sometimes). The key is to use products that contain positively charged ingredients to neutralise your hair.

Talk to our team of experts at Hair Rocks today and ask them as to the best products that we currently have in store that will assist you with the treatment of your damaged hair.

information source: beautyheaven.com.au
photo source: rentfrockrepeat.com

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